Your browser version is outdated. We recommend that you update your browser to the latest version.

Use the donate button above to easily make a donation to help provide services for victims of domestic & sexual violence! Every donation makes a difference!

 


*Even using the "escape" button, your computer will still have a trail showing you visited this website. Please use caution when visiting websites if you think your computer usage is being monitored.

Escape this site 

Click Here To Go To NO MORE's Website!

WE NEED YOUR HELP! HERE ARE SOME CURRENT ITEMS NEEDED FOR OUR SHELTER...

Click for larger image! Click For Larger Image

 CHECK OUT OUR NEW REGISTRY FOR SHELTER ITEMS WE NEED! SUPER EASY TO USE!

 ----------------------------------------

REACH of Macon County
P.O. Box 228
Franklin, NC 28744

 

Reach of Macon County on Facebook

 


Click on the "Donate" Button Below

 

 

 

 

A BIG Thank You to The Franklin Garden Club and Master Gardener's Association of Franklin, NC for the hard work their volunteers have been doing cleaning up the gardens around our office. 

 

Your hard work inspires us all to pay it forward! 

 






 


VOLUNTEER FOR US!

Interested in learning about volunteering for a non-profit? Passionate about wanting to help survivors of domestic & sexual violence? Read this article for some tips.


If you're interested in volunteering with us, sign up for our Volunteer Newsletter here to receive future announcements about our 2-day volunteer trainings.


If you are interested in volunteering before we hold our next training, give us a call to see what options we may have for you!


Macon Office

(828) 369-5544


Jackson Office

(828) 586-8969


To volunteer with us, please fill out our online volunteer registration form here.


 

Now Easily Donate Diapers to REACH Clients In Need

via Jet.com through their #GiveAPack program! Simply visit the following link to donate!

http://go.jet.com/give-REACH


 

REACH Expands Violence Prevention

GlaxoSmithKline Foundation Awards REACH

"Ribbon of Hope" Grant

Click to learn more about the Ribbon of Hope Grants by GlaxoSmithKline Foundation Click to learn more about the Ribbon of Hope Grants by GlaxoSmithKline Foundation

Click for official PDF of Press ReleaseClick for official PDF of Press Release

Why do people stay in abusive relationships?

People who have never been abused often wonder why a person wouldn’t just leave. They don’t understand that breaking up can be more complicated than it seems.

There are many reasons why both men and women stay in abusive relationships. If you have a friend in an unhealthy relationship, support them by understanding why they may choose to not leave immediately.

Conflicting Emotions

Fear: Your friend may be afraid of what will happen if they decide to leave the relationship. If your friend has been threatened by their partner, family or friends, they may not feel safe leaving.

Believing Abuse is Normal: If your friend doesn’t know what a healthy relationship looks like, perhaps from growing up in an environment where abuse was common, they may not recognize that their relationship is unhealthy.

Fear of Being Outed: If your friend is in same-sex relationship and has not yet come out to everyone, their partner may threaten to reveal this secret. Being outed may feel especially scary for young people who are just beginning to explore their sexuality.

Embarrassment: It’s probably hard for your friend to admit that they’ve been abused. They may feel they’ve done something wrong by becoming involved with an abusive partner. They may also worry that their friends and family will judge them.

Low Self-esteem: If your friend’s partner constantly puts them down and blames them for the abuse, it can be easy for your friend to believe those statements and think that the abuse is their fault.

Love: Your friend may stay in an abusive relationship hoping that their abuser will change. Think about it -- if a person you love tells you they’ll change, you want to believe them. Your friend may only want the violence to stop, not for the relationship to end entirely.

Pressure

Social/Peer Pressure: If the abuser is popular, it can be hard for a person to tell their friends for fear that no one will believe them or that everyone will take the abuser’s side.

Cultural/Religious Reasons:Traditional gender roles can make it difficult for young women to admit to being sexually active and for young men to admit to being abused. Also, your friend’s culture or religion may influence them to stay rather than end the relationship for fear of bringing shame upon their family.

Pregnancy/Parenting: Your friend may feel pressure to raise their children with both

parents together, even if that means staying in an abusive relationship. Also, the abusive partner may threaten to take or harm the children if your friend leaves.

 

Watching a friend go through an abusive relationship can be very scary and you may feel like you’re not sure how to help them. The decision to leave can only be made by the person experiencing the abuse, but there a lot of things you can do to help your friend stay safe.

 

What Do I Need to Know?

 

If your friend or family member is undergoing the serious and painful effects of dating abuse, they may have a very different point of view than you. They may have heard the abuse was their fault and feel responsible. If they do choose to leave, they may feel sad and lonely when it’s over, even though the relationship was abusive. They may get back together with their ex many times, even though you want them to stay apart. Remember that it may be difficult for your friend to even bring up a conversation about the abuse they’re experiencing.

 

What Can I Do?

 

• Don’t be afraid to reach out to a friend who you think needs help. Tell them you’re concerned for their safety and want to help.

 

• Be supportive and listen patiently. Acknowledge their feelings and be respectful of their decisions.

 

• Help your friend recognize that the abuse is not “normal” and is NOT their fault. Everyone deserves a healthy, nonviolent relationship.

 

• Focus on your friend or family member, not the abusive partner. Even if your loved one stays with their partner, it’s important they still feel comfortable talking to you about it.

 

• Connect your friend to resources in their community that can give them information and guidance. Remember, loveisrespect.org can help.

 

• Help them develop a safety plan.

 

• If they break up with the abusive partner, continue to be supportive after the relationship is over.

 

• Even when you feel like there’s nothing you can do, don’t forget that by being supportive and caring -- you’re already doing a lot.

 

• Don’t contact their abuser or publicly post negative things about them online. It’ll only worsen the situation for your friend.

This information collected from loveisrespect.org